1932 $20 St Gaudens MS65+ PCGS

The 1932 double eagle was never officially released into circulation, but rather they were stockpiled in Treasury vaults immediately after striking. A few found their way into numismatists' hands when they were exchanged for common date double eagles through unofficial connections at the Mint. The Gold Surrender Order put an end to this source and so the remaining coins sat in the vaults. In 1937 the Treasury started melting down gold held in their possession into ingots, virtually all of the 1,101,750 double eagles struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1932 headed off to the melting pots.
SKU: PA25530303
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$122,500.00
The 1932 double eagle was never officially released into circulation, but rather they were stockpiled in Treasury vaults immediately after striking. A few found their way into numismatists' hands when they were exchanged for common date double eagles through unofficial connections at the Mint. The Gold Surrender Order put an end to this source and so the remaining coins sat in the vaults. In 1937 the Treasury started melting down gold held in their possession into ingots, virtually all of the 1,101,750 double eagles struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1932 headed off to the melting pots.
 
The 1932 is one of the most desired of all Saint-Gaudens double eagles and represents the final collectible date in the series. The federal government melted virtually the entire mintage of just over 1.1 million pieces. According to records obtained from the mint in 1947 by Dr. Charles W. Green, a New York collector, only 110 Philadelphia double eagles were issued in 1932. Research by Roger W. Burdette has unearthed Mint and Treasury records that indicate a slightly different total of 113 double eagles were distributed to various institutions and private individuals in 1932, but these figures are in close agreement.
 
Estimates of the number of 1932 twenty dollar pieces that have survived to the present day have varied widely but are more or less leveled off in recent years. PCGS estimates that about 100 examples are known, which is consistent with David Akers' (revised 2008) estimate that "fewer than 100 coins have survived. Virtually all of these pieces are Mint State." Early estimates such as Walter Breen's (1988) statement that "possible 22-25 survive, almost all Unc" and David Bowers' (2004) suggestion that "between 60 to 80 different pieces," are too low.
 
PCGS and NGC combined have seen just more than 150 examples of the 1932 double eagle, a number of which are most probably resubmitted coins. Virtually all certified examples are in Uncirculated grades, primarily through near-Gem. Garrett and Guth write in their Gold Coins Encyclopedia that: "The Smithsonian collection example is possibly the finest known, and would probably grade MS67."
 
The 1932 is usually very sharply struck and exhibits frosty luster, though some are satiny in texture. Excessively abraded surfaces are not usually a problem, although most examples reveal a few scattered bagmarks. All in all, 1932 double eagles are exceptionally attractive coins with outstanding luster and color. The 1932 is superior in this regard to all other late-date issues with the possible exception of the 1930-S.
 
The present Premium Gem showcases thick, frosty wheat-gold luster rolls over the devices and pools in the fields on each side, illuminating the bold strike and unabraded surfaces. Eye appeal is superb.
 
Here is an opportunity to add one of the finest known examples into the most discriminating collection. Population 3 in MS65+
 
Offered at $115,000
 
Item Details
Year/MM 1932
Grading Service PCGS
Grade MS65+
Certification Number 25530303
CAC No
Mint Philadelphia
Strike Mint State
Numeric Grade 65